WHAT WOULD YOU DO PODCAST

WHAT WOULD YOU DO PODCAST

Closeout Sale EVERYTHING GOTTA GOOOOOO!!!!!!!

 

Southside Beauty Care is all but giving away the whole store



Southside Beauty Care African Skin Care is closing, so we're having a storewide sale!
The first 100 customers who use code CLOSEOUT will get 42.5% off their purchase over $50.
Everyone else will get 25% off their purchase over $50. So hurry while inventory lasts because it will
go fast.

Trad Print Umbrella Sundresses

 Keep The Tradition Alive And Get Your Dress Today


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dresses provide a beautiful design

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For only $25

Combine African tradition and comfort with this 1 Of 6 Trad Print Umbrella Sundresses. This dress has traditional African print on the center of the torso and along the hem. It is unstructured and loose, making it comfortable to wear all day long. This sleeveless, flowy dress is great for a summer day at the beach or hanging out with friends. It can be paired with leggings or worn as is. With dresses in multiple vibrant colors, you’ll never get bored choosing something to wear. $25 a piece plus shipping and handling.

Buy Now Before We Run Out Of Stock!






Get your African-print dress. Wear it with Pride

Tie-Dye Umbrella Dresses

Summer isn't over just yet.

Dresses for every body. Dresses for every size.

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All Day Comfort - This casual sundress is perfect for any occasion and can be paired with leggings or worn as is. Customizable Fit - This dress is constructed of a looser fabric, making it easy to tailor it to fit any body type. Timeless Design - Traditional African print dresses provide a beautiful design that never goes out of style.

Different styles, one idea. Dress up in 1 of 6 bold colors. African print never looked this good.

1 dress.6 Colors. 1 low price. $25 per dress plus shipping and handling.

Available in limited quantities




Rx Meds and Their Side Effects

We see it everyday on the Tell-Lie-Vision screen...



And when you are suffering it seems like heaven to hear they have something to soothe the itching, the scratching, the burning of your dry skin. They tell you that these are tested and proven true methods and they are right they do work wonders. But what they try to brush pass is the fact that all these Rx Eczema medications have side effects. And some of the side effects make you want to just deal with the Eczema, a pain we are already familiar with. 

So, if you are thinking of going on these Rx meds you should know at least what you are facing. This is why we have put together a condensed version of what these medications side effects are this way you are making an informed decision when picking your battle strategy to fight dry skin and constant discomfort. Below you will find these Meds and effects and their sources so you can exhaust every option before causing yourself more soreness in the end.

We hope that you will try mother natures home for hydrated skin before going to Man made solutions that might leave you worse for wear. So without further ado, lets pull off the veil...

Cyclosporine


Cyclosporine is an immunosuppressant drug that has been used since the early 1980's to prevent organ rejection after transplantation such as a liver transplant. It prevents rejection by inhibiting T Lymphocyte cells, specific cells of the immune system.

  • High blood pressure.
  • Increased hair growth. If this bothers your child, different methods of removing excess hair are available. Ask your doctor about the safest one for your child.
  • Swollen or inflamed gums. Tell your coordinator if your child has swollen gums. Your child may require more dental care, such as increased brushing and flossing and more frequent dental visits. This side effect usually occurs with higher doses of cyclosporine and may improve as the dose is reduced.
  • Numbness or tingling of the hands or feet. This side effect can be a sign that your child’s cyclosporine level is high. If your child’s medication is causing this side effect, the symptoms should improve as the medication dose is reduced.
  • Other common side effects are tremors, restlessness, stomach upset, nausea, cramps, diarrhea, headache, and changes in blood sugar.
  • Sinus drainage or runny nose. This effect should improve as the dose is reduced.
  • Hot flashes or sweating. This effect may occur several hours after each dose and will improve as the dose is reduced.
  • Elevated "kidney numbers." Your child’s creatinine and BUN will be monitored as part of irregular laboratory studies, to prevent and/or detect kidney damage. For this reason, it is important to always check with your coordinator before giving your child any new medications that could affect kidney function.
  • Increased risk of infection
  • Change in urination
  • Seizures
  • Fever
  • Sore throat
  • Unusual bleeding or bruising
  • Trouble breathing
  • Confusion
  • Blurred vision
  • Stomach pain
  • Hearing difficulty
  • Chest pain
  • Fatigue
If any of these side effects continues or becomes bothersome, inform your doctor.


Common side effects of cyclosporine include:




Methotrexate

Methotrexate may cause very serious, life-threatening side effects. You should only take methotrexate to treat cancer or certain other conditions that are very severe and that cannot be treated with other medications. Talk to your doctor about the risks of taking methotrexate for your condition.

Methotrexate is used to treat severe psoriasis (a skin disease in which red, scaly patches form on some areas of the body) that cannot be controlled by other treatments. Methotrexate is also used along with rest, physical therapy, and sometimes other medications to treat severe active rheumatoid arthritis (RA; a condition in which the body attacks its own joints, causing pain, swelling, and loss of function) that cannot be controlled by certain other medications. Methotrexate is also used to treat certain types of cancer including cancers that begin in the tissues that form around a fertilized egg in the uterus, breast cancer, lung cancer, certain cancers of the head and neck, certain types of lymphoma, and leukemia (cancer that begins in the white blood cells). Methotrexate is in a class of medications called antimetabolites. Methotrexate treats cancer by slowing the growth of cancer cells. Methotrexate treats psoriasis by slowing the growth of skin cells to stop scales from forming. Methotrexate may treat rheumatoid arthritis by decreasing the activity of the immune system.

Methotrexate may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • dizziness
  • drowsiness
  • headache
  • swollen, tender gums
  • decreased appetite
  • reddened eyes
  • hair loss
Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of these symptoms or those listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING section, call your doctor immediately:
  • blurred vision or sudden loss of vision
  • seizures
  • confusion
  • weakness or difficulty moving one or both sides of the body
  • loss of consciousness

Methotrexate may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).


Prednisone

Prednisone is used alone or with other medications to treat the symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced by the body and are needed for normal body functioning). Prednisone is also used to treat other conditions in patients with normal corticosteroid levels. These conditions include certain types of arthritis; severe allergic reactions; multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the nerves do not function properly); lupus (a disease in which the body attacks many of its own organs); and certain conditions that affect the lungs, skin, eyes, kidneys blood, thyroid, stomach, and intestines. Prednisone is also sometimes used to treat the symptoms of certain types of cancer. Prednisone is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works to treat patients with low levels of corticosteroids by replacing steroids that are normally produced naturally by the body. It works to treat other conditions by reducing swelling and redness and by changing the way the immune system works.

Prednisone may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • headache
  • dizziness
  • difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep
  • inappropriate happiness
  • extreme changes in mood
  • changes in personality
  • bulging eyes
  • acne
  • thin, fragile skin
  • red or purple blotches or lines under the skin
  • slowed healing of cuts and bruises
  • increased hair growth
  • changes in the way fat is spread around the body
  • extreme tiredness
  • weak muscles
  • irregular or absent menstrual periods
  • decreased sexual desire
  • heartburn
  • increased sweating

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

  • vision problems
  • eye pain, redness, or tearing
  • sore throat, fever, chills, cough, or other signs of infection
  • seizures
  • depression
  • loss of contact with reality
  • confusion
  • muscle twitching or tightening
  • shaking of the hands that you cannot control
  • numbness, burning, or tingling in the face, arms, legs, feet, or hands
  • upset stomach
  • vomiting
  • lightheadedness
  • irregular heartbeat
  • sudden weight gain
  • shortness of breath, especially during the night
  • dry, hacking cough
  • swelling or pain in the stomach
  • swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs
  • difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • rash
  • hives
  • itching

Prednisone may slow growth and development in children. Your child's doctor will watch his or her growth carefully. Talk to your child's doctor about the risks of giving prednisone to your child.

Prednisone may increase the risk that you will develop osteoporosis. Talk to your doctor about the risks of taking prednisone and about things that you can do to decrease the chance that you will develop osteoporosis.

Some patients who took prednisone or similar medications developed a type of cancer called Kaposi's sarcoma. Talk to your doctor about the risks of taking prednisone.

Prednisone may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while you are taking this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).


Mycophenolate

As soon as you go to Medline Plus for this drug, you see an immediate window of warnings stated below:

Risk of birth defects:

Mycophenolate must not be taken by women who are pregnant or who may become pregnant. There is a high risk that mycophenolate will cause miscarriage (loss of the pregnancy) during the first 3 months of pregnancy or will cause the baby to be born with birth defects (problems that are present at birth).

You should not take mycophenolate if you are pregnant or if you may become pregnant. You must have a negative pregnancy test before starting your treatment with mycophenolate, again 8 to 10 days later, and at routine follow-up appointments. You must use acceptable birth control during your treatment, and for 6 weeks after you stop taking mycophenolate. Your doctor will tell you which forms of birth control are acceptable for you to use. Mycophenolate may decrease the effectiveness of oral contraceptives (birth control pills), so it is especially important to use a second form of birth control along with this type of contraceptive.

If you are a male with a female partner who may become pregnant, you should use acceptable birth control during treatment and for at least 90 days after your last dose. Do not donate sperm during your treatment and for at least 90 days after your last dose.

Call your doctor right away if you think you or your partner, is pregnant or if you miss a menstrual period.

Because of the possibility that your donation may go to a female who may be or become pregnant, do not donate blood during your treatment and for at least 6 weeks after your last dose.

Risks of serious infections:

Mycophenolate weakens the body's immune system and may decrease your ability to fight infection. Wash your hands often and avoid people who are sick while you are taking this medication. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: fever, sore throat, chills, or cough; unusual bruising or bleeding; pain or burning during urination; frequent urination; wound or sore that is red, warm, or won't heal; drainage from a skin wound; general weakness, extreme tiredness, or sick feeling; symptoms of the ''flu'' or a ''cold''; pain or swelling in the neck, groin, or armpits; white patches in the mouth or throat; cold sores; blisters; headache or earache; or other signs of infection.

You may be infected with certain viruses or bacteria but not have any signs of infection. Taking mycophenolate increases the risk that these infections will become more severe and cause symptoms. Tell your doctor if you have any type of infection, such as Hepatitis B or C, including an infection that does not cause symptoms.

Mycophenolate may increase the risk that you will develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML; a rare infection of the brain that cannot be treated, prevented, or cured and that usually causes death or severe disability). Tell your doctor if you have or have ever had PML, or another condition that affects your immune system such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); sarcoidosis (a condition that causes swelling in the lungs and sometimes in other parts of the body); leukemia (cancer that causes too many blood cells to be produced and released into the bloodstream); or lymphoma. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: weakness on one side of the body or in the legs; difficulty or inability to control your muscles; confusion or difficulty thinking clearly; unsteadiness; memory loss; difficulty speaking or understanding what others say; or a lack of interest or concern for usual activities or things you usually care about.

Mycophenolate may increase your risk of developing certain types of cancer, including lymphoma (a type of cancer that develops in the lymph system) and skin cancer. Tell your doctor if you or anyone in your family has or has ever had skin cancer. Avoid unnecessary or prolonged exposure to real and artificial sunlight (tanning beds, sunlamps) and light therapy and wear protective clothing, sunglasses, and sunscreen (with a SPF factor of 30 or above). This will help to decrease your risk of developing skin cancer. Call your doctor if you experience any of the following symptoms: pain or swelling in the neck, groin, or armpits; a new skin sore or bump; a change in the size or color of a mole; a brown or black skin lesion (sore) with uneven edges or one part of the lesion that does not look like the other; skin changes; sores that do not heal; unexplained fever; tiredness that does not go away; or weight loss.

Your doctor or pharmacist will give you the manufacturer's patient information sheet (Medication Guide) when you begin treatment with mycophenolate and each time you refill your prescription. Read the information carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. You can also visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website http://www.fda.gov/Drugs to obtain the Medication Guide.

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will order certain lab tests to check your body's response to mycophenolate.

Talk to your doctor about the risks of taking mycophenolate because this ins't even the list of side effects which are:

Mycophenolate may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • constipation
  • stomach pain or swelling
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep
  • pain, especially in the back, muscles, or joints
  • headache
  • gas
  • prickling, tingling, or burning feeling on the skin
  • muscle stiffness or weakness
Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms or those listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING section, call your doctor immediately:
  • diarrhea, sudden severe stomach pain
  • swelling of the hands, arms, feet, ankles, or lower legs
  • difficulty breathing
  • chest pain
  • rash
  • itching
  • fast heartbeat
  • dizziness
  • fainting
  • lack of energy
  • pale skin
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • black and tarry stools
  • red blood in stools
  • bloody vomit
  • vomit that looks like coffee grounds
  • blood in urine
  • yellowing of the skin or eyes

Mycophenolate may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).


Azathioprine

Visiting Medline Plus, you get another window that reads:

Azathioprine may increase your risk of developing certain types of cancer, especially skin cancer and lymphoma (cancer that begins in the cells that fight infection). If you have had a kidney transplant, there may be a higher risk that you will develop cancer even if you do not take azathioprine. Tell your doctor if you have or have ever had cancer and if you are taking or have ever taken alkylating agents such as chlorambucil (Leukeran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), or melphalan (Alkeran) for cancer. To decrease the risk that you will develop skin cancer, avoid prolonged or unnecessary exposure to sunlight and wear protective clothing, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Tell your doctor immediately if you notice any changes in your skin or any lumps or masses anywhere in your body.

Some teenage and young adult males who took azathioprine alone or with another medication called a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker to treat Crohn's disease (a condition in which the body attacks the lining of the digestive tract causing pain, diarrhea, weight loss, and fever) or ulcerative colitis (a condition which causes swelling and sores in the lining of the colon [large intestine] and rectum) developed hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma (HSTCL). HSTCL is a very serious type of cancer that often causes death within a short period of time. Azathioprine has not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, but doctors may sometimes prescribe azathioprine to treat these conditions. If you develop any of these symptoms during your treatment, call your doctor immediately: stomach pain; fever; unexplained weight loss; night sweats or easy bruising or bleeding.

Azathioprine can cause a decrease in the number of blood cells in your bone marrow, which may cause serious or life-threatening infections. The risk that the number of blood cells that you have will decrease is highest if you have a genetic (inherited) risk factor. Your doctor may order a test before or during your treatment to see if you have this risk factor. Taking certain medications may also increase the risk that your blood cells will decrease, so tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following: angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril, enalapril (Vasotec), fosinopril, lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), Ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra); and ribavirin (Copegus, Rebetol, Virazole). If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: unusual bleeding or bruising; excessive tiredness; pale skin; headache; confusion; dizziness; fast heartbeat; difficulty sleeping; weakness; shortness of breath; and sore throat, fever, chills, and other signs of infection. Your doctor will order tests before, during, and after your treatment to see if your blood cells are affected by this medication.

Talk to your doctor about the risks of taking this medication.

But, if you keep reading you find a whole other list of side effects that can partner with those above.

Azathioprine may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms or those listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING section, call your doctor immediately.

  • rash
  • fever
  • weakness
  • muscle pain

This medication may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while you are taking azathioprine.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).


Dupixent

This injectable is no better. Matter of fact it could be the worse of them all. The side effects can cause much more than just discomfort, and can even be fatal. there are also different levels of side effects based off of age, weight, sex, so on and so forth.

Mild side effects

  • injection site reactions
  • eosinophilia (increased level of eosinophils, which are a type of white blood cell)
Serious side effectsSide effect focus
Joint pain
  • Stretch daily and before exercise to help maintain a healthy range of motion in your joints.
  • Stay physically active to help keep your joints strong.
  • Listen to your body and rest your joints when needed if they’re painful.
  • Consider an over-the-counter (OTC) pain reliever. Some examples include acetaminophen (Tylenol) or a topical product that’s applied to the skin, such as diclofenac (Voltaren) gel. If you’re unsure if OTC pain relievers are safe for you, check with your doctor or pharmacist.
Eye problems
Cold sores due to herpes virus
  • Abreva (OTC)
  • Denavir (Rx)
ALLERGIC REACTION
  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)
  • hives (raised, itchy bumps on your skin)
  • erythema nodosum (reddish or discolored, painful lumps under your skin, usually on your lower legs)
  • serum sickness (an immune system reaction that causes fever, rash, and joint pain or swelling)

Here’s a list of some of the mild side effects that Dupixent can cause. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or read Dupixent’s patient information.

Mild side effects of Dupixent that have been reported include:

Mild side effects of many drugs may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become bothersome, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They may suggest ways to help reduce side effects.

* For more information on this side effect, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

Serious side effects from Dupixent can occur, but they aren’t common. If you have serious side effects from Dupixent, call your doctor right away. However, if you think you’re having a medical emergency, you should call 911 or your local emergency number.

Serious side effects of Dupixent that have been reported include:

* For more information on this side effect, see the “Side effect focus” section below.

Learn more about some of the side effects Dupixent may cause.

Joint pain is a possible side effect of Dupixent.

Side effects of Dupixent, such as joint pain, may differ between people with different conditions. For instance, joint pain was a common side effect in studies of people who took Dupixent for chronic sinusitis (long-term sinus swelling) with nasal polyps. (Polyps are tissue growths that can make it difficult to breathe through your nose.)

But joint pain isn’t typically a common side effect in people who take Dupixent for eczema or asthma.

Joints are places in your body where your bones meet, such as your elbows, hips, and knees. Joint pain may feel like an ache or soreness that may get worse when you move around.

What might help

Joint pain from Dupixent may be relieved without medical treatment.

Here are some tips that you can do at home to help ease joint pain:

If your joint pain is not relieved with these tips, or it becomes severe, call your doctor. They might want to examine you for other causes of joint pain. Or they may suggest other ways to lessen the pain.

Some mild and serious eye problems have happened in people receiving Dupixent.

Conjunctivitis (pink eye) is a common side effect in people taking the drug for eczema. Though less common, this side effect is also seen in people receiving Dupixent for chronic sinusitis with nasal polyps. Conjunctivitis hasn’t been reported as a side effect in people taking the drug for asthma.

Conjunctivitis symptoms may include swelling, itching, and reddening of your eye and eyelid.

Serious eye problems, such as corneal ulcers, are also possible with Dupixent. Symptoms of this condition include eye pain, blurred vision, and sensitivity to light. If you develop these symptoms, it’s important to seek medical care right away.

It’s also possible that Dupixent could cause eye pain or cause problems with your vision. If you’re concerned about eye or vision problems with this medication, talk with your doctor.

What might help

Eye itching or irritation due to conjunctivitis can be bothersome, but it’s usually not serious. You may find relief with just a cool compress. You could also try over-the-counter eye itch relief drops, such as ketotifen (Alaway, Zaditor).

If you develop eye crusting or colored mucus, or a fever, it could be a sign of an eye infection. If this happens, or your eye symptoms become severe, call your doctor. They may recommend treatment with a prescription eye drop or medication.

If you notice vision changes or develop eye pain, you should not wait to see if it gets better on its own. To be safe, call your doctor. They can suggest next steps to help manage your eye problems.

Dupixent does not cause infections with herpes virus. But if the virus is already inside your body, Dupixent may increase your risk for cold sores (oral herpes). Cold sores are a common side effect in people taking this drug.

Cold sores may appear on your lips or mouth. They’re small, blister-like lesions that are commonly caused by the herpes virus. People sometimes notice an itch or tingling sensation in their lips or mouth before a cold sore appears.

What might help

Without treatment, cold sores usually go away on their own within 1 to 2 weeks.

Some over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription (Rx) treatments can help cold sores heal faster. Examples of these treatments include:

Some people may have an allergic reaction to Dupixent. Allergic reactions were reported in studies of Dupixent, but they were rare.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet. They can also include swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat, which can cause trouble breathing.

Some people who had allergic reactions during studies of Dupixent developed the following symptoms:

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Dupixent. But if you think you’re having a medical emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number.